Role
Visiting Professor
Education
PhD in Italian Literature, minor in Comparative Literature, Stanford University - CA, USA
MA in American Studies, University of Kansas - KS, USA
Laurea in Foreign Languages and Literatures, Universita' Cattolica S. Cuore - Milan, Italy

Biography

Born and Raised in Gallarate, Italy, Miami Galli Stampino holds a laurea in Foreign Languages (English and French) from Università cattolica “Sacro Cuore” of Milan, a Master’s in American Studies from the University of Kansas, and a PhD in Italian with a minor in Comparative Literature from Stanford University. She started her career as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures at the University of Miami, was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure and then to Professor; she served as Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in the College of Arts and Sciences for five years prior to joining AUR. She is the author of Staging the Pastoral: Torquato Tasso’s Aminta and the Emergence of Modern Western Theater (Tempe: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 2005); the editor and translator of Lucrezia Marinella’s Enrico, ovvero Bisanzio acquistato (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009; and Modena: Mucchi, 2011); and the co-editor, with Julie D. Campbell, of In Dialogue with the Other Voice in Sixteenth-Century Italy: Literary and Social Contexts for Women’s Writing (Toronto: ITER, 2011), and with Anne J. Cruz, of Early Modern Habsburg Women: Transnational Contexts, Cultural Conflicts, Dynastic Continuities (Burlington: Ashgate, 2013).

Books:
Anne J. Cruz and Maria Galli Stampino, editors. Early Modern Habsburg Women: Transnational Contexts, Cultural Conflicts, Dynastic Continuities.  Burlington: Ashgate, 2013. Pp.294. Print.
       Honorable Mention, Collective Work published in 2013, Society for the Study of Early Modern Women

Lucrezia Marinella.  L’Enrico, ovvero Bisanzio acquistato.  Edizione critica a cura di Maria Galli Stampino.  Modena: Mucchi, 2011. Pp. 608. Print.

Julie D. Campbell and Maria Galli Stampino, editors.  In Dialogue with the Other Voice in Sixteenth-Century Italy: Literary and Social Contexts for Women’s Writing. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe, the Toronto Series. Toronto: Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2011. Pp. 385. Print and E-Book.

Lucrezia Marinella.  Enrico, or Byzantium Conquered. Heroic Poem.  Ed. and transl. Maria Galli Stampino.  The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe.  Chicago: U of Chicago P: 2009. Pp. 477. Print and E-Book.

Maria Galli Stampino.  Staging the Pastoral: Tasso’s Aminta and the Emergence of Modern Western Theater.  Tempe, AZ: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 2005. Pp. xviii + 310. Print.

Essays in Collections:
“Forgetting the Mediterranean: Renaissance Historiography and Xenophobia in Contemporary Italian Culture.”  The Renaissance Revised Expanded Unexpurgated.  Ed. Medina Lasansky.  Pittsburgh: Periscope, 2014. 548-69. Print.

“Maria Maddalena, Archduchess of Austria and Grand Duchess of Florence: Negotiating Performance Traditions and Taste.”  Early Modern Habsburg Women: Transnational Contexts, Cultural Conflicts, Dynastic Continuities.  Ed. Anne J. Cruz and Maria Galli Stampino.  Burlington: Ashgate, 2013. 40-56. Print.

“Fantasmi di genere ne L’Enrico, overo Bisanzio acquistato, poema eroico.”  A Portrait of a Renaissance Feminist. Lucrezia Marinella’s Life and Works.  Ed. Antonella Cagnolati.  Rome: Aracne, 2012.  125-48.  Print.

“Alessandro Piccolomini’s Raffaella: A Parody of Women’s Behavior and Men’s Dialogues.” In Dialogue with the Other Voice in Sixteenth-Century Italy: Literary and Social Contexts for Women’s Writing. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe, the Toronto Series. Toronto: Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2011.  89-111.  Print and E-Book.

“Centrality and Liminality is Bernardino Ochino’s ‘Sermon Preached . . . on the Feast Day of St. Mary Magdalen.’” In Dialogue with the Other Voice in Sixteenth-Century Italy: Literary and Social Contexts for Women’s Writing. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe, the Toronto Series. Toronto: Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2011.  325-47.  Print and E-Book.

“The Rhetoric of Alterity in Giovanni Sartori’s Writing.”  Italian Cultural Studies, 2001: Selected Essays.  Ed. Anthony Julian Tamburri.  Boca Raton: Bordighera, 2004.  146-167. Print.

“What We Talk about When We Talk about (Italian) Cultural Studies, and Why.”  Italian Cultural Studies.  Ed. Graziella Parati and Ben Lawton.  Boca Raton: Bordighera, 2001. 26-51. Print.

Articles in peer-reviewed journals:
“The Woman Narrator’s Voice: The Case of Lucrezia Marinella’s Enrico.” Italian Studies 69.1 (March 2014): 75-94. Print.

“A Regent and Her Court: Towards a Study of Maria Maddalena d’Austria’s Patronage (Florence 1621-28).”  Forum Italicum 40.1 (Spring 2006): 22-35. Print.

“Pastoral Constraints, Textual and Dramatic Strategies: Isabella Andreini’s La Mirtilla and Torquato Tasso’s Aminta.”  Italian Culture 22 (2004): 1-20. Print.

“The Body in/of the Text: Italian Literary and Musicological Positions, 1554-1630.”  Romance Studies 21 (July 2003): 77-90. Print.

“Rôles et espaces de la Commedia dell’Arte à Paris.”  Studi di letteratura francese 26 (2001): 79-92. Print.

“Performative Spaces: Commedia dell’arte, London, and Institutional Powers.”  RLA 11 (1999): 371-79. Print.

“Classical Antecedents and Teleological Narratives: on the Contamination of Opera and Courtly Sung Entertainment in the Early Seventeenth Century.”  Italica 77.3 (Autumn 2000): 331-56. Print.

“Publish or Perish: An Early-Seventeenth-Century Paradox.”  RLA 10 (1998): 373-79. Print.

“Performance, Text, and Canon: The Case of Aminta.”  RLA 9 (1997): 351-58. Print.
“Epideictic Pastoral: Rhetorical Tensions in the Staging of Torquato Tasso’s Aminta.”  Theatre Symposium: Drama as Rhetoric / Rhetoric as Drama 5 (1997): 36-49. Print.

“Space of the Performance: Aminta, the Court, and the Theater.”  Romance Review 6.1 (Fall 1996): 7-28. Print.

“Bodily Boundaries Represented: The Petrarchan, the Burlesque, and Arcimboldo’s Example.”  Quaderni d’italianistica 16.1 (Spring 1995): 61-79. Print.