Adding an international experience to your degree can be hugely beneficial to your future career opportunities: taking on overseas study shows that you are motivated to broaden your horizons, testifies to your cross-cultural communication skills, and will give you confidence in yourself and your own abilities. A summer abroad at AUR makes for a global education that will enhance your career and life prospects.

Art History

ART OF ROME

Monday - Thursday
8:50 am - 11:10 am
Most classes off-campus
3 credits

An introductory course in the history of art. The course focuses on Rome, from its origin to contemporary times. Masterpieces of painting, sculpture, architecture, and urban planning are examined within their historical contexts. Most of the classes are held off-campus. The course hones a method of description, critical analysis, and interpretation of art and builds an understanding of traditional forms and cultural themes useful in the comprehension of all western art.Students are responsible for all entry fees.


SACRED SPACE: RELIGIOUS ARCHITECTURE OF ROME

Monday - Thursday
8:50 am - 11:10 am
Most classes off-campus
3 credits

Explores main ideas behind the sacral space on the example of the sacral architecture of Rome, from the ancient to the postmodern. The course maximizes the opportunity for off-campus teaching in Rome; most classes are held in the real surrounding, which best illustrates particular topics of the course. Students will have the opportunity to learn about different religious traditions, various religious ideas, and practices (including the ancient Roman religion, early Christianity, Roman Catholicism, Orthodoxy, and Protestantism, as well as the main elements of religion and sacred spaces of ancient Judaism and Islam). Students will have the opportunity to experience a variety of sacred spaces and learn about the broader cultural and historical context in which they appeared. Short study trips outside of Rome may also take place.


 

Archaeology & Classics

ROMAN ARCHAEOLOGY ON-SITE

Monday - Thursday
8:50 am - 11:10 am
Off-campus
3 credits

An introductory off-campus course exploring the archaeological sites and ancient monuments of Rome. The course will begin with the evidence for the earliest settlement in Rome and continue through the development of the Republic, the empire, and the transition to early Christian Rome. The course will focus on placing the archaeological and architectural evidence in its topographical context. Students are responsible for all entry fees.


 

Business Administration

SUSTAINABLE ENTERPRISE AND SOCIALRESPONSIBILITY

Monday - Thursday
2:50 pm - 5:10 pm
On-campus
3 credits

strives to disentangle complex ethical and sustainability issues in the contemporary global business environment. We examine how the ethical landscape has evolved and present a variety of frameworks for making decisions in the best interest of organizations, their stakeholders, and society. Issues related to sustainability receive particular attention, and we investigate the challenges, incentives, and creative solutions that might be employed in fostering changes in organizations, including examining their relationship and responsibility to individuals, governments, and global society. Pre-requisites: ENG 102.


 

Communication and Digital Media

INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION

Monday - Thursday
2:50 pm - 5:10 pm
On-campus
3 credits

Interercultural communication is an attempt to understand communication among people when cultural identifications affect the message. One approach is to learn the barriers one needs to overcome, such as ethnocentrism, stereotyping, nonverbal misunderstandings, and translation difficulties. Students will learn how to recognize and overcome these barriers and how to understand and relate to other cultures. Pre-requisites: ENG 100 or ENG 101.


 

International Relations & Global Politics

THE US, THE EU, AND CHINA: WHO IS GOING TO LEAD?

Monday - Thursday
11:50 am - 2:10 pm
On-campus
3 credits

An advanced course of International Relations where students will learn how to apply Theories of International Relations to critically analyze contemporary global affairs between the US, the EU, and China. Will these global actors increasingly try to use power politics or institutional cooperation? Will they be able to write together the rules of the Game? The US, the EU, and China might recur to different policies and strategies depending on the circumstances and prevailing ideologies. Accordingly, the future of International Relations can be mapped in four scenarios: 1. Each global power tries to undermine the others, i.e., everyone goes alone = mistrust and anarchy; 2. A coalition between the western powers, i.e., The US and the EU against China = instability; 3. The China Age, i.e., a threat to Western powers; 4. The construction of an effective multi-polar world, i.e., The US, The EU, and China = equilibrium. Pre-requisites - Junior standing; IA 200 or equivalent.


SECURITY AND ENERGY IN THE XXI CENTURY

Monday - Thursday
2:50 pm - 5:10 pm
On-campus
3 credits

Focused on the relationship between security and energy supplies, with a particular focus on three major global actors: the US, Russia, and Turkey in order to assess how they interact in the South Caucasus. Assessing the evolution of theory and practice of national security in the last twenty years, this course will illustrate the concept of energy security and its implications on States’ behavior. In particular, the policies of Russia, Turkey, and the US will be investigated as well as how the State control - or influence - over some key strategic resources and areas is crucial in the XXI century international scenario. The approach will be comparative and diachronic. In particular, illustrating the relevance of the Caspian region into different eras, students will learn to critically analyze the interactions among major, middle, and local powers and how material factors (i.e., geography and the control over strategically relevant resources) affect international politics. Pre-requisites - IA 200 or ECO 211 or equivalent or permission of the instructor.


 

Italian Studies and Modern Languages

ITALIAN FOOD AND CULTURE

Monday - Thursday
2:50 pm - 5:10 pm
Some off-campus experiences
3 credits

This course will focus on the social and cultural aspects of food and eating in different geographical areas with a special emphasis on Italy and its history. The course will be taught through a variety of readings, class discussions, and presentations, and there will also be some practical experiences. Please note that this is not a cooking course. Pre-requisites - ENG 102. Conducted in English.


INTRODUCTION TO ITALIAN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE

Monday - Thursday
8:50 am - 11:10 am
Some off-campus experiences
3 credits

For those with no previous training in Italian, the course introduces features of the Italian language needed for interaction in everyday practical situations, such as the caffè, restaurants, accommodation, and in shops. The course satisfies a limited number of immediate needs necessary for survival in the target language culture. Cultural topics, such as religion in Italy, Italian geography, and Italian families, will also be studied through readings in English in order to familiarize the student with certain aspects of contemporary Italian society and culture.No placement examination. This course does not constitute a pre-requisites for ITL 102. This course can not be taken simultaneously with or after the successful completion of ITL 101.