Our Summer 1 Session for 2018 runs from 31 May to 27 June 2018. Available courses are listed below.
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Art History

AH 100 ART OF ROME
Credits: 3
Times: Monday to Thursday, 8:50 am to 11.10 am
Dates: 31 May to 27 June 2018
On site course: Yes
Art of Rome is an introductory course in the history of art and of the history of Rome from its origin to contemporary times. Masterpieces of painting, sculpture, architecture and urbanism are examined with attention to their specific historical contexts; ancient, medieval, renaissance, baroque and modern. Most classes are held on site. The course hones a method of description, critical analysis and interpretation of art and builds an understanding of traditional forms and cultural themes useful in the comprehension of all western art. Students are responsible for all entry fees.

AH 313 THE ART OF NEOCLASSICISM: ROME,NAPLES AND SICILY​ 
Credits: 3
Times: Monday to Thursday, 8:50 am to 11.10 am
Dates: 31 May to 27 June 2018
Os III sought to legitimize his newly-formed Kingdom of Naples and the Two Sicilies (1734) by excavating the treasure trove of antiquity buried at Herculaneum and Pompeii. These efforts led to Neoclassicism, the late 18th-century’s dominant cultural and intellectual trend. Through classroom lectures and on-site visits, this course will explore why and how the ‘rediscovery’ of ancient art triggered a new visual language that revolutionized subject, style, and content of European and American art, as well as the ways in which those transformations responded to the varying context-specific demands of particular times and locations. We will look at artists from America, England, France, Germany, and Italy, and visit their works contained in Roman collections.
Pre-requisites: A lower-level art history course or permission of instructor. Students will pay a fee to cover the cost of the field-trips.

Archeology & Classics

ARC 101 ROMAN ARCHEOLOGY ON-SITE 
Credits: 3
Times: Monday to Thursday, 8:50 am to 11.10 am
Dates: 31 May to 27 June 2018
On site course: Yes
This is an introductory on-site course exploring the archeological sites and ancient monuments of Rome. The course will begin with the evidence for the earliest settlement in Rome and continue through the development of the Republic, the empire and the transition to early Christian Rome. The course will focus on placing the archeological and architectural evidence in its topographical context.
Students are responsible for all entry fees.

ARC 293 ARCHEOLOGY PRACTICUM 
Credits: 3
Times: Monday to Friday, 8:00 am to 5.00 pm
Dates: 31 May to 27 June 2018
On site course: Yes
Archaeology 293 is a practicum course that allows students to experience archaeological excavation first hand and to receive credit for it. In Summer 2017 AUR will be collaborating with Universita degli Studi Roma Tre to offer a training excavation in the area of the Imperial Fora in the center of Rome (precise location to be determined). Training will cover techniques of excavation, recording, washing and classifying the finds. The working week will be Monday to Friday from 8.00am to 5.00pm with a mid morning break of 30 minutes and a one hour lunch break. Students must commit to the full working week. This means that they will not be able to take another class at the same time and they will not be able to sign up for Friday trips. Students who are not Archaeology and Classics majors at AUR need to contact Prof Higgins (v.higgins@aur.edu) before their registration can be confirmed.

ARCL 401 ROME OF AUGUSTUS 
Credits: 3
Times: Monday to Thursday, 2:50 pm to 5.10 pm
Dates: 31 May to 27 June 2018
This interdisciplinary course combines archeology, art history, history, literature and sociology to explore a defining moment in the ancient world: Rome at the time of Augustus (c.44 BC-c.14 AD). The students will create an image of the emperor Augustus through his own building projects and writings and assess the role of imperial propaganda in this process. We ask how culture, identity and power were shaped in particular contexts by social factors such as religion, gender, the economy and status, presenting case studies of building projects, review contemporary philosophical ideas and contemporary comment. This interdisciplinary course enables students to develop their skills of analysis and evaluation across a range of ancient source materials.
Pre-requisites: Level 300 course in Classics, Classical Studies, Classical Archeology or Ancient History or permission of the instructor.

CLRE 202 CHRISTIANITY AND THE ROMAN EMPIRE (100-425 AD) 
Credits: 3
Times: Monday to Thursday, 11:50 am to 2.10 pm
Dates: 31 May to 27 June 2018
This course offers an overview of the history of the Early Church from 100-425 AD, focusing on the confrontation of Christianity with Roman life and thought. It will examine that relationship both from the early Christian and early Roman perspectives. Field trips to historical sites and museums in Rome will be used to reanimate ancient Roman history.
Pre-requisites: ENG 102. Students are responsible for all entry fees.

Business Administration

MGT 307 BUSINESS PSYCHOLOGY
Credits: 3
Times: Monday to Thursday, 11:50 am to 2.10 pm
Dates: 31 May to 27 June 2018
In this course students develop insight into human nature which is fundamental to business success. In depth study of emotional intelligence, motivation theory, leadership, and group dynamics provides students with a sound basis for making mature assessments of themselves and of others. Lecture, readings, class discussion, case study, and in-class role-play teach students to apply insight and intuition to analyzing challenging inter-personal business dilemmas. All discussions emphasize a real world orientation with additional emphasis on effective analytical methods and written and oral communication skills.
Pre-requisites: PSY 101 or any 200-level Business course or permission of the instructor

MKT 310 INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
Credits: 3
Times: Monday to Thursday, 8:50 am to 11.10 am
Dates: 31 May to 27 June 2018
Designed to be a bridge from the Principles of Marketing course to upper-level marketing courses, such as Advertising, this course introduces students to IMC, an innovative approach to marketing communications (the Promotion P of the Marketing Mix). Smart marketers today no longer manage the various promotional tools separately but rather first develop Integrated Marketing Communications Strategies that ensure that their many promotional efforts are unified. The IMC approach ensures a single, clear, concise, coherent message that is supported by each of the promotional tools. Students explore these tools (Advertising, Public Relations, Sales Promotion, Personal Selling, Direct Marketing and Alternative Marketing), while honing creative and decision-making skills.
Pre-requisites: MKT 200.

MKT 312 FOOD TOURISM 
Credits: 3
Times: Monday to Thursday, 2:50 pm to 5.10 pm
Dates: 31 May to 27 June 2018
This course will be an introduction to the growing segment of the tourism market centered on the exploration of food. The general public awareness of food and dining has grown tremendously in the past years as television has focused on food as an element of travel. Many individuals will plan their travels based on food. This class on food tourism will focus on learning the geography of food for various regions of the world through the study of the qualities and attributes of various cuisines and the role that culinary tourism plays in their economy.
Pre-requisites: MGT 201 or MKT 200 or equivalent or permission of the instructor.

MKT 316 GLOBAL FASHION MARKETING 
Credits: 3
Times: Monday to Thursday, 11:50 am to 2.10 pm
Dates: 31 May to 27 June 2018
We live in a consumer centric world and the fashion industry is one of the main drivers of consumer purchases around the globe. In this course students are introduced to core marketing activities surrounding the world of fashion. These activities include but are not limited to market segmentation, market research, consumer motivation, product strategy, pricing, promotions and retail distribution. Fashion marketing will explore the terminology and fundamentals of the fashion industry while examining the development of fashion products from concept to consumer. Marketing principles, practices, and policies used by fashion manufacturers, wholesalers, and retailers will be explored. A global perspective of fashion marketing will also be discussed.
Pre-requisites: MKT200

Communication

COM 203 PUBLIC SPEAKING AND PRESENTATION
Credits: 3
Times: Monday to Thursday, 11:50 am to 2.10 pm
Dates: 31 May to 27 June 2018
This course analyzes and applies principles of speech structures to oral presentation. Students learn to analyze audiences, adapt messages, apply critical listening skills and practice ethical decisions in preparing public speaking. Emphasis is placed on building a positive speech environment and practicing speech presentations.

COM 402 DIGITAL COMMONS
Credits: 3
Times: Monday to Thursday, 8:50 am to 11:10 pm
Dates: 31 May to 27 June 2018
This course deals with issues related to reproduction of information and participatory culture from the amateur press to zines and online piracy. It explores the development of collective intelligence in virtual communities and peer-to-peer platforms. Moreover, the relationship between the political economy and the technological affordances of digital media will be discussed. Concepts such as open-source, copy-left, and commonism will be analyzed.
Pre-requisites: COM209 and/or permission of the instructor

English Writing, Literature, and Publishing

ENG 308 PLAYFUL SUBVERSION: UNDERSTANDING POSTMODERN TEXT 
Credits: 3
Times: Monday to Thursday, 11:50 am to 2:10 pm
Dates: 31 May to 27 June 2018
The aim of the course is to situate select theoretical and literary texts within the post-modern aesthetic, and to understand both postmodern theory and post-modern writing as commentary on, and reaction to, a world disenchanted of the myth of progress, suspicious of the legitimacy of authority, and filled with anxiety over the attribute of authenticity in identity, experience, and “things in the world.” Where modernist writers have reacted with nostalgia, however, postmodernists have seen opportunity for "playful subversion" of the fundamental categories of western thought. We will consider subversion of narrative, history, identity, and gender. Where subversion aims at a clear break with power, playfulness seeks to transform this radical uncertainty into a space for individual freedom. 
Pre-requisites: ENG 102.

ENG 314 WRITING THE MEDITERRANEAN
Credits: 3
Times: Monday to Thursday, 8:50 am to 11:10 am
Dates: 31 May to 27 June 2018
The Mediterranean has captivated and inspired writers for centuries. This course aims to introduce students to Mediterranean landscapes and cityscapes, and serves as a map for possible journeys, inspiring works—poetry, fiction and nonfiction—by students. As a starting historical point, the course explores the idea of Mediterraneaness, and its contemporary politics, society, culture, identities and languages. By reading the most exciting and best-known literary works inspired by major Mediterranean cities (Marseilles, Venice, Dubrovnik, Alexandria, Thessaloniki, Istanbul etc.) students will attain an awareness of the richness and complexity of the region, while exploring their voice and vision, and becoming active and engaged writers.
Pre-requisites: ENG 102.

Fine Arts

ART 101 ITALIAN SKETCHBOOK: IMAGES OF ROME 
Credits: 3
Times: Monday to Thursday, 8:50 am to 12:10 pm
Dates: 31 May to 27 June 2018
On site course: Yes
Italian Sketchbook is an introductory course in drawing. On-site classes will provide landscape views, architectural forms, paintings and three-dimensional sculpture as subject matter, using pencil, pen, charcoal and sanguigna as drawing techniques. The course includes art historical introductions to sites, individual drawing projects and a written component related to the experience of sketching on location. The aim is to develop confidence and visual awareness in creating representations of the vast selection of art works that Rome has to offer. Students are responsible for all entry fees.

Film and Digital Media

CIN 300 POST WAR ITALIAN CINEMA 
Credits: 3
Times: Monday to Thursday, 11:50 am to 2:10 pm
Dates: 31 May to 27 June 2018
This course develops an appreciation of Italian cinema from the 1940s to the present focusing on movements, trends, relevant and recurring themes and visual features. While students are provided with an understanding of the role played by cinema in Italian society they are also encouraged to look at film as a universal language capable of crossing geographic boundaries. The impact of film trends in other European countries is also explored.
Pre-requisites: Junior or Senior standing or permission of the instructor.

FDM 211 PODCASTING & VIDCASTING 
Credits: 3
Times: Monday to Thursday, 2:50 pm to 5:10 pm
Dates: 31 May to 27 June 2018
This course is designed to introduce students to the basic techniques of creating a series of Podcasts and Vidcasts. Hands-on training will be used to write, direct, produce, and edit both forms of New Media for broadcasting online. Students will learn the importance of broadcast media such as Podcasts and their powerful influence in the world of Marketing and Communications, while Vidcasts will introduce students to creation of web-based content for informative and creative content. Students will use all of the necessary audio and video equipment to create weekly Podcasts and Vidcasts which will be streamed at AUR. Through the course of the semester, students will experience first-hand all aspects of writing, production, speaking and editing.
Pre-requisites: ENG 100 or ENG101. Laboratory course fee Euro 75.

International Relations and Global Politics

ANT 300 THE MEDITERRANEAN WORLD​ 
Credits: 3
Times: Monday to Thursday, 8:50 am to 11.10 am
Dates: 31 May to 27 June 2018
This course addresses recent cultural, social and political changes in the Mediterranean area, but from a historical perspective. The course will combine theoretical discussions with case studies from the three main regions of the Mediterranean area: the Middle East, North Africa, and Southern Europe. While stressing a comparative perspective, regional variations will be addressed throughout the course. The approach is multi-disciplinary, combining anthropology, sociology, history and political science. The first part of the course will address mainly cultural themes, while the second part of the course will address mainly political themes.
Pre-requisites: Junior or Senior standing

POL 202 COMPARATIVE POLITICS
Credits: 3
Times: Monday to Thursday, 8:50 am to 11:10 am
Dates: 31 May to 27 June 2018
Basic concepts used to compare political systems and understand how they function: the nature of politics, power and authority, political order, change and participation. The basic building blocks of politics in different states are examined and analyzed, the relative merits and disadvantages are evaluated enabling students to understand their workings and make judgments on their effectiveness.

SOC 120 LIVING ROME: URBAN SPACES, CULTURE AND IDENTITY
Credits: 3
Times: Monday to Thursday, 11:50 am to 2:10 pm
Dates: 31 May to 27 June 2018
On site course: Yes
This course will give students the opportunity to actively explore the multiple dimensions of the City of Rome systematically and on the basis of a theoretical framework of urbanism, cultural studies and social theory. The students will examine how the city impacts its citizens, its businesses and social organizations. The course satisfies information technology requirements.

Italian Studies

COIS 320 ITALIAN MEDIA AND POPULAR CULTURE
Credits: 3
Times: Monday to Thursday, 2:50 pm to 5:10 pm
Dates: 31 May to 27 June 2018
This course has a thematic approach, applying the analytical theories of cultural studies to contemporary Italian media and popular culture, focusing on: the evolution of Italian print and broadcast media in terms of their impact on Italian culture and society; the effect of Italy’s regional character on sports, use of language, gastronomic traditions; the role of folktales, popular theatre and folk music; popular expressions of religious life (Carnival, Passion Plays etc); the relationship between local craftsmanship and high fashion. Students will apply and develop their analytical skills by actively engaging with these phenomena through field trips, case-studies and example texts.
Pre-requisites: Junior or Senior standing or SOC 100 or COM 105 or a 100- or 200-level non-language ITL course. Students are responsible for all entry fees. Students will pay a fee to cover the cost of the field-study trip.

IS 212 ITALIAN FOOD AND CULTURE
Credits: 3
Times: Monday to Thursday, 8:50 am to 11:10 am OR 11:50 am to 2:10pm (2 courses)
Dates: 31 May to 27 June 2018
This interdisciplinary course will focus on the social and cultural aspects of food and eating in different geographical areas with a special emphasis on Italy and its history. The course will be taught through a variety of readings, class discussions and presentations and there will also be some practical experiences. Please note that this is not a cooking course.
Pre-requisites: ENG 102. Conducted in English.

IS 301 THE MAFIA IN ITALIAN SOCIETY, LITERATURE AND FILM
Credits: 3
Times: Monday to Thursday, 11:50 am to 2:10 pm
Dates: 31 May to 27 June 2018
This course aims to explore representations of the Italian Mafia in literature and cinema, with reference also to the Italian-American context. Students will be introduced to the history of the Mafia, starting from its beginnings in Sicily, and follow its historical and geographical evolution within, and also outside, Italy. The course will make reference to Italian literary texts as well as Italian and Italian-American cinematic representations of the phenomenon.
Pre-requisites: ENG 102. 

ITL 100 INTRODUCTION TO ITALIAN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE
Credits: 3
Times: Monday to Thursday, 8:50 am to 11:10 am OR 11:50 am to 2.10 pm OR 2:50 pm to 5:10 pm (3 courses)
Dates: 31 May to 27 June 2018
Open to students with no previous training in Italian, the course introduces features of the Italian language needed for interaction in everyday practical situations, such as the caffè, restaurant, accommodation and in shops. The course satisfies a limited number of immediate needs necessary for survival in the target language culture. Cultural topics, such as religion in Italy, Italian geography, and Italian families will also be studied through readings in English, in order to familiarize the student with certain aspects of contemporary Italian society and culture.
No placement examination.
This course does not constitute a pre-requisites for ITL 102.
This course can not be taken simultaneously with, or after successful completion of ITL 101.

ITL 101 ELEMENTARY ITALIAN I 
Credits: 4
Times: Monday to Thursday, 2:50 pm to 5.50 pm
Dates: 31 May to 27 June 2018
In this course students establish an introductory base in the Italian language in the four areas of language skills: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. At the successful completion of this course students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in everyday spoken Italian by performing the following functions: greet people and introduce themselves, give and follow simple directions, respond to and ask questions, describe their families and friends, order items in a café, discuss their life at school and hobbies, express likes and dislikes, and recount recent past actions. Students will be able to read simple written texts in Italian and write short paragraphs on familiar topics. Students will also have gained specific knowledge about contemporary Italy through cultural readings on topics such as family life, pastimes, and food and wine culture.
No placement examination. Required for AUR degree students.

Mathematics & Science

ENV 102 PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY
Credits: 3
Times: Monday to Thursday, 11:50 am to 2:10 pm
Dates: 31 May to 27 June 2018
This course introduces the physical elements and processes responsible for: weather and climate, vegetation, soils, plate tectonics, landforms, their distributions, and their significance to humans. This special session of Physical Geography examines these processes as they are expressed in the context of the Italian Peninsula and larger Mediterranean region.