AUR’s general education requirements reflect the key concepts that make an American liberal arts university education unique. In addition to preparing students in the foundational skills of English writing, mathematics, the sciences, and the fundamentals of the Italian language, our general education program offers students the opportunity to develop the critical and creative capacity to explore larger questions of knowledge and meaning. Through required courses in the Arts and Humanities, the Social Sciences, and the Creative Arts, students will learn an interdisciplinary approach to complex topics and to examine concepts from a variety of angles.
 
The First Year Experience-Explorations in the Liberal Arts
AUR’s First Year Seminar is a signature, two-semester sequence required of all first year students, irrespective of their choice of major. Communal learning—where all first-years students encounter the same questions, experiences, and texts—and the critical discussions that emerge from small seminars, make AUR’s first year seminar distinctive.

FYS 101 introduces first time in college students to the culture of being in an American university in the heart of Europe.
FYS 102, Explorations in the Liberal Arts: The Meanings of Empire, is intellectually stimulating and personally transformative for students. Team-taught by four of AUR’s distinguished full-time faculty from a variety of disciplines, the course challenges students to engage with the historical and theoretical meanings of imperial power, from the ancient world to the British Empire to the technological imperialism of mainstream and social media. The course features lively lectures from global experts, thought-provoking group experiences, and on-site visits ranging from the Roman forums to Cinecitta studios, prompting students to examine how human experience is expressed, how meaning is made, by what rules we should be governed. The interdisciplinary approach fosters a habit of mind that students will employ throughout their studies at AUR and into life beyond the classroom.

Completion of the General Education program is a requirement for all bachelor’s degrees, and makes use of courses throughout the AUR curriculum. Consistent with the mission of the University, the program develops important practical skills, addresses social issues of diversity, multiculturalism and ethics and draws on the rich resources of the city of Rome as a learning tool. Reflecting the mission of the institution, it strives to ensure that all students, regardless of major, will share a common dialogue which will prepare them to live and work across cultures.
 
The goals of The American University of Rome’s General Education program are:

  1. to develop and strengthen basic skills which will prepare students upon graduation for a modern working environment and which will be adaptable to a rapidly evolving economy.
  2. to cultivate an awareness of, and sensitivity to, cultural diversity and its importance in personal and professional decision making.
  3. to achieve a broad knowledge base, drawn from multiple disciplines, typical of an American Liberal Arts Education.
  4. to use Rome as a classroom and as an invaluable learning resource.
  5. to encourage active and responsible citizenship through knowledge of the forces shaping the actions of individuals and societies and through the development of critical thinking.

The General Education program requirements are shared by all majors, though each major may also require particular General Education courses to satisfy major requirements.

A.     FOUNDATIONAL SKILLS (17-35 credits)

AUR requires that all students achieve excellence in the following skills: Writing, Quantitative Reasoning, and Italian Language. These skills provide a basic knowledge which can be adapted to any academic discipline and will enable the individual to respond effectively to challenges both in the classroom and in his or her profession.
 
There are four elements to the Foundational Skills program: First Year Seminars (FYS 101 and 102), Writing Skills, Quantitative Reasoning, and Italian Language competence. These elements are satisfied by taking required courses that specifically address these skills. Foundational courses must be completed by the end of the sophomore year (within the first 60 credits).
 
1.     First Year Program (0-6 credits)                                                                                                   
These courses provide a transition to university studies for first-time-in-college students. FYS 101 (First-Year Seminar) introduces students to the skills and practices necessary for a successful college career, and is tied closely to foundational courses in writing. FYS 102 (Explorations in the Liberal Arts) builds on the academic skills acquired in the first semester, allowing students to explore a theme from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. Transfer students with 30 or more transfer credits are exempted from this requirement.
 
FYS 101                First-Year Seminar
and
FYS 102                Explorations in the Liberal Arts

2.     Writing Skills (6-12 credits)
All students must take three courses in English or Writing which will ensure that all students can write grammatically correct English and express themselves clearly in language suited to the target audience. These skills are further developed in the Breadth of Knowledge section of the General Education requirements, and through discipline-specific upper-level courses within the major.
 
Students will be placed in a course appropriate to their writing ability via placement test or transfer credits before their first semester, and may need up to three semesters to complete the requirement.
 
ENG 100               Comprehensive Writing Fundamentals (6 credits)
or
ENG 101 Writing Fundamentals

or placement test results waiving ENG 101 requirement
and
ENG 102               Writing from Research
ENG 202               Writing from Theory
 
3.     Quantitative Reasoning (3-6 credits)                                                                                 
All students should be capable of performing basic mathematical operations and applying them to analyze data within their fields of study. Students may select a course focusing on general mathematical principles or applied mathematics, although a specific course or courses may be required by the major.*
 
MTH 102              Basic Statistics
or
MTH 104              Mathematics for the Liberal Arts
or
MTH 123              College Algebra
 
*Students planning majors in Business Administration and/or International Relations & Global Politics are required to complete both MTH 102 and MTH 123 as pre-requisites for major Core courses.
 
4.     Italian Language Competence (8-14 credits)                                                                       
In order to appreciate the opportunities that Rome has to offer it is considered essential that all students have a basic competence in the Italian language and culture. All students must demonstrate a proficiency in Italian equivalent to one year of study or demonstrate that this level of competency has already been reached by achieving an appropriate score on the Italian placement examination.
Students may be exempted from all or part of the Italian language requirement by virtue of competency demonstrated through proficiency placement examinations. Such exemptions do not yield any credit unless the exemption is based on successful completion of college courses. Some majors require additional study in Italian for major requirements*; see individual program descriptions for more details.
 
ITL 101 Elementary Italian I (4 credits)
and
ITL 102 Elementary Italian II (4 credits)
or
ITL 103 Intensive Elementary Italian I and II (8 credits)
and
ITL 201 Intermediate Italian I
ITL 202 Intermediate Italian II
*Students pursuing majors in Archaeology and Classics, Fine Arts or Italian Studies must complete ITL 201; students majoring in Art History must complete also ITL 202.

B.     BREADTH OF KNOWLEDGE (18 credits)

The goal of a Liberal Arts education is to enable students to be flexible and critical thinkers in a variety of subjects, and to apply interdisciplinary methodologies to solve problems in the classroom, in the workplace, and in their own lives. Towards this end, AUR students take courses in all of the disciplinary areas that contribute to the Liberal Arts: Creative Arts, Humanities, Natural Science, and Social Science. As well as introducing students to the varied approaches to knowledge, the courses included in these content areas integrate key skills essential to a successful career in college and in the workplace, such as Information Literacy, Oral Presentation, and Information Technology.

Breadth of Knowledge courses may also satisfy major or minor requirements, or serve as free electives. These courses may be completed at any time during the bachelor’s degree, though students will derive greater benefit from the content and embedded skills by completing them within the first 90 credits.
 
1.     Creative Arts
Creative Arts courses allow students to understand the creative process through practical engagement in the literary, performing, and visual arts. These courses emphasize the creation of art, to inspire students towards innovative thinking in all disciplines. 
 
Students must complete one Creative Arts course.
 
ART 101 Italian Sketchbook: Images of Rome
ART 103 Printmaking I
ART 115 Painting Techniques I
ENG 203 Writing Rome
DRM 201 Acting
FAFD104 Photography:Rome

2.     Humanities
Humanities courses take as their main subject the products of human culture. In these courses, students learn to analyze and respond to the formal qualities of cultural products, to place works, movements, and ideas within their various contexts (historical, religious, social, philosophical etc.), and to communicate their knowledge and analysis in appropriate written form.
 
Students must complete two Humanities courses; at least one must be at the 200-level.
 
AH 100 Art of Rome
AH 102 Arts of the Middle Ages: Fourth to Fourtheenth Century
AH 103 Arts of Renaissance and Baroque
AH 104 Arts of Modernity
AH 111 Saints and Sinners in Rome
AH 205 Italian Fashion: From the Carnival of Venice to the Milan Fashion Week
AH 209 Papal Power, Papal Art
AH 210 Van Gogh to Warhol
AH 212 Contemporary Art in the Global Village
AH 215 Art of the United States
AH 219 Renaissance Art from Florence to Rome
AHAR 101 Arts of Antiquity
AHAR 204 Ancient North Africa
AHAR 214 Egyptian Art and Archaeology
AHRE 106 Sacred Space: Religious Architecture of Rome
ARRE 201 The Archaeology of Roman Religion
CIN 202 Introduction to Film Theory
CLHS 203 History of Ancient Greece: Bronze Age to the Hellenistic Period
CLHS 205 Rome: Republic & Empire
CLRE 202 Christianity and the Roman Empire (100-425 AD)
CLS 101 Greek and Roman Mythology
CLS 204 Classics and Comics: Ancient Culture and modern Sequential Art
CLS 208 Love and Laughter in Ancient Literature
ENG 200 Survey of British Literature I
ENG 201 Survey of British Literature II
ENG 204 Survey of American Literature
ENG 206 Introduction to Poetry
ENG 207 Introduction to Drama
ENG 208 Introduction to Fiction
HST 200 History of Modern Italy
IS 206 Italian Culture at the Movies
IS 210 Introduction to Italian Culture
IS 212 Italian Food and Culture
IS 220 Travels to/through Italy
MUS 201 Masterpieces of Italian Opera
REL 200 Religion in a Pluralistic World
 
3.     Natural Science
Natural science courses introduce students to the use of the scientific method to explain phenomena in the physical and biological worlds. Via experimentation in a laboratory context and/or observation in the field, students gain the ability to observe and analyze their own natural environment. 
 
Students must complete one Natural Science course.
 
ASTR 100 General Astronomy
BIO 203 Philosophy and Mechanisms of Evolution
ENV 102 Physical Geography
ENV 103 Environmental Science
PHYS 102 Explorations in Physics
 
4.     Social Science
Social science courses focus on the relationship between individuals and social structures, and how both individuals and societies influence institutions, cultures, and ideas. Students learn to implement the methodologies of social science to understand social forces, such as the economy, media, and politics, both at a point in time and over time.
 
Students must complete two Social Science courses; at least one must be at the 200-level.
 
ANT 100 Introduction to Anthropology
ARC 104 Investigating Archaeology: Methods and Techniques for Analyzing the Past
ARC 203 Global Heritage
ARC 205 Archaeology of the Holy Land
ARC 215 Great Kingdoms of the Ancient Near East
ARCL 209 Roman Army
BUFD 208 Film/TV Industry
BUS 200 Business Law
COIS 221 The Italian American Experience
COM 105 Communication and Society
COM 209 New Media and Society
COM 210 Popular Music and Mass Culture
COM 219 Intercultural Communication
COMK 202 Media Research
ECO 211 Principles of Macroeconomics
ECO 212 Principles of Microeconomics
ECPO 204 The European Union: Origins, Evolution, and Impact
HSSO 208 Sport and Society
IA 100 Introduction to International Relations: History and Concepts
IA 200 International Relations: Theories and Cases
IA 202 International Organizations
IA 203 U.S. and Europe since 1945
POL 101 Introduction to Political Science
POL 120 Introduction to the American Political System
POL 203 An Introduction to Ethics
PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology
SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology
SOC 120 Living Rome: Urban Spaces, Culture and Identity

C.     ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS (12 credits)

1.     Diverse Perspectives (6 credits)
As a campus in a cosmopolitan world capital, with a student body that is inherently culturally diverse, AUR is committed to furthering global understanding of different cultures and ways of thinking. Via courses that explore diversity, in areas including but not limited to culture, race, gender, social status, class, and religion, students are encouraged to explore perspectives different from their own. All students will take two courses to satisfy this requirement; these courses are found throughout the curriculum, and may or may not satisfy additional General Education or major requirements.
 
AH 212 Contemporary Art in the Global Village
AH 215 Art of the United States
AHAR 204 Ancient North Africa
AHRE 106 Sacred Space: Religious Architecture of Rome
ANT 100 Introduction to Anthropology
ANT 300 The Mediterranean World
ARC 203 Global Heritage
ARC 205 Archaeology of the Holy Land
ARC 215 Great Kingdoms of the Ancient Near East
COIS 221 The Italian American Experience
COM 210 Popular Music and Mass Culture
COM 219 Intercultural Communication
COM 324 Explorations in Cultural Studies
ECPO 204 The European Union: Origins, Evolution, and Impact
ECPO 313 Globalization
ENG 204 Survey of American Literature
HSSO 208 Sport and Society
HST 307 History of the Modern Middle East
IA 100 Introduction to International Relations: History and Concepts
IA 202 International Organizations
IA 301 Comparative Foreign Policy
IA 305 International Relations of East Asia
IA 307 International Human Rights
IS 212 Italian Food and Culture
IS 220 Travels to/through Italy
MGT 301 Organizational Behavior in a Global Context
POL 101 Introduction to Political Science
POL 120 Introduction to the American Political System
POL 203 An Introduction to Ethics
POL 309 Migration and Multiculturalism in Europe
REL 200 Religion in a Pluralistic World
SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology
SOC 300 Sociology of Contemporary Italy
 
2.    Roma Caput Mundi (6 credits)
 
Rome has a unique position in Western culture and the modern city of Rome reflects more than 2,500 years of cultural development. All the disciplines that AUR offers are actively practiced and studied in the Eternal City, and contribute to its vibrant social, cultural, and political identity. All students will take two courses which bring them out of the classroom and into the city to examine the heritage, aesthetic beauty and/or contemporary life of Rome. Courses may be at any level, and may or may not satisfy additional General Education or major requirements.
 
AH 100 Art of Rome
AH 102 Arts of the Middle Ages: Fourth to Fourtheenth Century
AH 103 Arts of Renaissance and Baroque
AH 104 Arts of Modernity
AH 111 Saints and Sinners in Rome
AH 209 Papal Power, Papal Art
AH 219 Renaissance Art from Florence to Rome
AH 313 The Art of Neoclassicism: Rome, Naples and Sicily
AH 401 Caravaggio
AH 402 Bernini
AH 403 Michelangelo in Rome
AH 404 Raphael and the High Renaissance in Florence and Rome
AHAR 101 Arts of Antiquity
AHAR 300 Roman Imperial Art & Architecture
AHAR 307 Late Antique & Byzantine Art
AHAR 314 Etruscan Art and Archeology
AHRE 106 Sacred Space: Religious Architecture of Rome
AHRE 303 Saint Peter and the Vatican: The Evolution of the Site
ARC 101 Roman Archaeology on-site
ARC 103 Ancient Roman Technology
ARC 104 Investigating Archaeology
ARC 301 Archeology of Roman Identity
ARCL 209 Roman Army
ART 101 Italian Sketchbook: Images of Rome
CLHS 205 Rome: Republic and Empire
ENG 203 Writing Rome
FAFD 104 Photography: Rome
IS 305 Rome On-Screen and in Print
MGT 302 Doing Business in Italy
MUS 201 Masterpieces of Italian Opera
SOC 120 Living Rome: Urban Spaces, Culture and Identity
 

D.     ALTERNATIVE EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE (0 or more credits)

Each student’s program of study must include at least one application of his or her gained knowledge and skills to an educational experience beyond the traditional university classroom. Such experiences encourage students to consider the relevance of their studies in real-world contexts, to understand their individual impact on the community beyond the AUR campus, and to contribute to their own future success. Some Alternative Educational Experiences are credit-bearing (Internship, travel courses etc.) with graded assignments and/or required tasks, others may not be credit-bearing and will require a reflective process* (in the form of essay, artwork, blog, or other output) to complete the requirement. Possible Alternative Educational Experiences:
 

  • Internship (INT 450)
  • Service Learning*
  • Study Abroad
  • Fieldwork/Practicum or other non-AUR credit-bearing or volunteer* program)
  • Independent Travel for Research (minimum 7 consecutive days)*
  • Three 1-credit field trip courses
  • Military service*
  • Participation in an undergraduate conference, performance, exhibition, or journal outside of the university, which has been peer-reviewed, juried, or otherwise assessed for scholarly or artistic merit

*Students must consult with their advisors before embarking upon an Alternative Educational Experience; if the selected AEE does not take place within a defined course or term, the student must submit a brief proposal and completion schedule, to be approved by their advisor and the Director of General Education.